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(I)migration + Action = Global Reaction Training Course.

(I)migration + Action = Global Reaction Training Course.

Madrid, Spain, 10 - 16 December 2017 (Act Global & Partners)

13 young people from Spain, Indonesia, Bulgaria, Kenya, Germany, Republic Dominica and Estonia were in Madrid for a (I)migration + Action = Global Reaction Training Course. This course focused on the global movement of people and on issues of migration. This course challenged personal understanding of the field of immigration studies, categorizations of the different populations studied, analyzes new trends in immigration studies and global population movement. We found the course most enjoyable.

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Our Training Course in Madrid on 10-16 December 2017 was for lack of a better word, indescribable. We had so many new experiences and met so many new people. It was an experience we will never forget, and we’re so thankful that we had the opportunity.

We were in Madrid for a (I)migration + Action = Global Reaction Training Course. This course focused on the global movement of people and on issues of migration. This course challenged personal understanding of the field of immigration studies, categorizations of the different populations studied, analyzes new trends in immigration studies and global population movement. We found the course most enjoyable. Our trainer, Milk, shared amazing depth of knowledge and excellent teaching skills further enhanced the experience. The course was not only useful, it was transformational. During the course period, we made some valuable connections with the participants, those already employed in various development institutions. Having the opportunity to meet people from various countries and diverse development backgrounds gave the course a really interesting angle with different ideas, concepts and approaches to evaluation issues.

We visited the Ministry of Social Policies and Family – the General Directorate of Social Services and Social Integration. The institution commits to promoting policies and actions on social services related to individuals and groups at risk of social exclusion, homeless, immigrants, ethnic minorities, lesbians, bisexual and transgender people.

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We discussed about Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) problems. As a consequence of the migratory phenomena, the problems associated with FGM have extended to the countries receiving the immigrants. The practice of FGM has repercussions on the physical, psychic, sexual and reproductive health of women, severely deteriorating their current and future quality of life. Violence, human trafficking, sexual exploitation and assault, abuse, discrimination and neglect are added to the already critical pile of challenges shared by all people on the move, in temporary settlements, refugee camps, and reception centres, in their own or foreign country. Accordingly, there is an even greater need to invest in gender equality education for all and other preventive measures, and to provide for adequate protective and responsive mechanisms for women and girls who are survivors of violence.

Additionally, we also had the opportunity to learn about immigration in Spain. Many migrants try to enter Spain as a means of reaching other parts of Europe. Once inside Spain’s enclaves, migrants & refugees are usually taken to temporary shelters and later moved to the Spanish mainland or returned to their country of origin. After a period of adaptation, migrants & refugees must be integrated and found places in the labour markets, which is not always an easy task. The lack of legal, operational, administrative and financial resources to streamline and speed-up asylum procedures and to enforce deportation orders are the major concerns.

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We were given free time, which we used for visiting some places in Madrid. We visited San Lorenzo de El Escorial, which is one of the municipalities of the greatest tourist and cultural interest in the heart of the Guadarrama Sierra (on one side of Mount Abantos), just 50 kilometres from Madrid. Its main attraction is the San Lorenzo de El Escorial Monastery and Royal Site, which has been declared to be a UNESCO Heritage Site in 1984. Escorial was built by King Philip II between 1563 and 1584. The architects were Juan Bautista of Toledo and his assistant Juan de Herrera. There is a Library that has 45,000 books from the 15th and 16th centuries, as well as 5000 manuscripts in Arabic, Latin, and Spanish. There are many windows, so this library is full of light. The vaulted ceiling has beautiful frescoes done by Pellegrino Tibaldi in the mannerist style, similar to Michelangelo’s style. The Library is the most beautiful part of the palace. There is also a very long gallery called the Gallery of Battles, which has very long paintings of battles. The vaulted ceiling frescoes are done in the Roman style.

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We joined the Free Walking Tour in Madrid, we explored different sides of the city by foot on a 3 hours free tour Madrid, with passionate local guides and learned the history of the Spanish capital, the amazing stories of legends and anecdotes of this majestic city. Spain for more than two decades has been the scene of intercultural relations between people from South America, Eastern Europe and North Africa mostly. Asia hasn’t been less and has also participated in giving colour to the palette of multiculturalism. The history of Spain is a history of constant cultural blending. From the Neolithic period to the Iron Age, it’s all a complex development of different cultures. In 1800 BC the people of El Argar developed bronze technology, which soon spread to other regions in the land. The same happened with language, customs, and habits. All these facts are examples of pure multiculturalism. With the arrival of the Phoenicians, the Romans, and the Greeks cultural mingling became even more significant. This resulted in great cultural advancements in philosophy, art, mathematics, music, architecture, science, and poetry, among other things. Some important examples of the extensive mixing of cultures during this period; the great philosopher Seneca, the Roman emperors Trajan and Hadrian, and the poets Martial and Lucan were all born in Spain. The process of cultural blending continues right up until the present day.

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